Friday, July 11, 2014

HSUS going down.....................

Halfway Through 2014, HSUS is Reeling

We recently passed the halfway point of 2014. And what news so far this year regarding the Humane Society of the United States? Let’s review:
  • HouseofCardsFallingThe Oklahoma Attorney General announced that his office was opening an investigationinto HSUS’s fundraising, issuing a consumer alert along the way.
  • HSUS released its latest annual report, showing that its contributions were down $20 million in 2013.
  • The federal racketeering lawsuit naming HSUS and two of its employees came to an end after HSUS agreed to settle the case, paying up to $15.75 million in the process. Not only that, but we discovered (and the press later reported) that HSUS was denied insurance coverage for this litigation, something HSUS “failed to tell reporters” when announcing the settlement.
  • Charity Navigator, the nation’s largest charity evaluator, lowered HSUS’s rating after we exposed HSUS’s incorrect tax filings, in which HSUS had inflated its revenue. (HSUS also filed years’ worth of amended returns with the IRS.)
  • Then, Charity Navigator replaced its rating of HSUS entirely, issuing a “Donor Advisory” against HSUS, which indicates “extreme concern.”
  • HSUS tried to flex its fundraising muscle on Capitol Hill, and hardly anyone showed up. Then, Capitol Hill pub POLITICO wrote not one, but two embarrassing blurbs about HSUS in the following weeks, noting in one instance that HSUS was holding a lobby day while Congress was in recess.
  • Quadriga Art, one of HSUS’s top contractors—HSUS has given it over $30 million in the past few years—reached a $25 million settlement with the New York Attorney General after Quadriga was exposed for keeping most of the money it raised for a veterans charity. Sound like a familiar refrain?
  • We blew the lid off of HSUS’s Cayman Islands scheme—exposing the tens of millions of dollars that HSUS has socked away offshore instead of giving that money to pet shelters. (By the way, have you entered our contest?)
  • In statehouses, HSUS anti-farmer legislation has been stymied. Actually, it’s not just agriculture issues—we can hardly think of any HSUS bills that have passed.
All in all, it’s been a bad year so far for America’s self-described “most effective” animal rights group, and an especially trying time for HSUS CEO Wayne “I don’t love animals” Pacelle.
When your opponent has taken a blow (or nine), it’s not the time to let up. It’s the time to stay on offense. We have a few things planned for the second half of 2014. Stay tuned.
Posted on 07/10/2014 at 5:57 pm by Humane Watch Team.

Monday, June 9, 2014

Organic Farming the untold story

The Biggest Myth About Organic Farming

The majority of Americans believe that organic foods are healthier than food grown using conventional methods. The majority of Americans are wrong. Two systematic reviews, one from Stanford University and the other by a team of researchers based out of the United Kingdom, turned up no evidence that organic foods are more nutritious or lead to better health-related outcomes for consumers.
But the idea that organic foods are healthier isn't even the largest myth out there. That title belongs to the widely held belief that organic farming does not use pesticides. A 2010 poll found that 69% of consumers believe that to be true. Among those who regularly purchase organic food, the notion is even more prevalent. A survey from the Soil Association found that as many as 95% of organic consumers in the UK buy organic to "avoid pesticides."
In fact, organic farmers do use pesticides. The only difference is that they're "natural" instead of "synthetic." At face value, the labels make it sound like the products they describe are worlds apart, but they aren't. A pesticide, whether it's natural or not, is a chemical with the purpose of killing insects (or warding off animals, or destroying weeds, or mitigating any other kind of pest, as our watchful commenters have correctly pointed out). Sadly, however,"natural" pesticides aren't as effective, so organic farmers actually end up using more of them!*
Moreover, we actually know less about the effects of "natural" pesticides. Conventional "synthetic" pesticides are highly regulated and have been for some time. We know that any remaining pesticide residues on both conventional and organic produce aren't harmful to consumers. But, writes agricultural technologist Steve Savage, "we still have no real data about the most likely pesticide residues that occur on organic crops and we are unlikely to get any."
Scientists can examine pesticides before they are sprayed on fields, however. And what do these analyses show?
"Organic pesticides that are studied have been found to be as toxic as synthetic pesticides," Steven Novella, president and co-founder of the New England Skeptical Society, recently wrote.
Organic foods are no safer than conventional foods. Even Katherine DiMatteo, executive director of the Organic Trade Association (OTA), recognizes this as fact. An “organic label does not promise a necessarily safer product," she once remarked (PDF).
So why are the misconceptions so pervasive? According to an in-depth report by Academics Review, a group founded by University of Illinois nutritional scientist Bruce M. Chassy and University of Melbourne food scientist David Tribe, the organic and natural-products industry -- which is worth an estimated $63 billion worldwide -- has engaged in a "pattern of research-informed and intentionally-deceptive marketing and advocacy related practices with the implied use and approval of the U.S. government endorsed USDA Organic Seal." Like their succulent fruits and scrumptious vegetables that we eat, the organic industry has given consumers a nibble of untruth and a taste of fear, and have allowed misunderstanding to sow and spread while they reap the benefits.
Commenting on the extensive report on his popular podcast, The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe, Novella had some blunt words for the organic industry.
"People buy organic because they think it's better for the environment; it's not. It's safer; it's not. It tastes better; it doesn't. It's more nutritious; it isn't. And these are all misconceptions that have been deliberately promoted -- according to these authors -- by organic farmers and organic proponents despite the fact that scientific evidence doesn't support any of these claims."
(Image: AP)
*Section updated 6/6

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Succession Planning Seminar

IALF to offer estate, succession planning seminar

A seminar on estate and succession planning will be presented by the Indiana Agricultural Law Foundation on July 17. The seminar will provide basic resources for families considering the future of their farm.
“Conversations about what happens to the farm after someone’s death can be uncomfortable,” said John Shoup, IALF director. “If families let that discomfort prevent the conversation from happening, it can end poorly for everyone. This is an opportunity to hear from two of the most highly regarded attorneys in the state that deal with these family-farm issues.”
The day-long event will feature sessions on why a succession plan is necessary for a farm, basics of estate planning, choosing a business structure, Medicare planning and insurance.
The seminar will end with a question-and-answer panel with three of the day’s presenters, which include attorneys Gary Chapman of Bose McKinney and Evans and Dan Gordon of Gordon and Associates, and Ken Roney of Indiana Farm Bureau Insurance. Ken Foster, Purdue Department of Agricultural Economics, is also on the agenda.
Early registration is available for $50 until June 16. If space is still available, the registration cost after June 16 will be $75. Space is limited for this event. Early sign-up is encouraged.
Future seminars on estate and succession planning are being designed; this seminar provides a foundation for those in the future.
Indiana Farm Bureau is a sponsor of the seminar, which will be held at the IFB home office in downtown Indianapolis. Registration and additional information is available on the IALF website, www.inaglaw.org, or by calling Maria Spellman, 317-692-7840.

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

A Winning Drink at the 500

Farmers get ready for milk hand-off

Two Indiana dairy farmers are preparing to be the most sought-after people at the Indianapolis 500. Ken Hoeing, a dairy farmer and Farm Bureau member from Rushville, and Alan Wright, a dairy farmer from Muncie, are this year’s Indy 500 Milkman and Rookie Milkman.
Hoeing lives and works on the dairy farm his grandparents established in 1947. He and four of his brothers take care of 400 dairy cows and raise crops on 3,000 acres. He and his wife, Denise, have two children, Kim and Chris.
Hoeing will hand the coveted Bottle of Milk (once chosen as the "Sports World's Coolest Prize") to the winning driver. Wright will hand a bottle of milk to the winning team owner and chief mechanic.
The 2014 race will mark the 59th consecutive year that milk has been presented to the winner of the Indy 500.

Friday, May 2, 2014

2014 Marion Twp. Putnam County Ballot Example

UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE - DISTRICT 4 KEVIN J GRANT REPUBLICAN

UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE - DISTRICT 4 TODD ROKITA REPUBLICAN

UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE - DISTRICT 4 JEFFREY O BLAYDES DEMOCRATIC 

UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE - DISTRICT 4 JOHN F DALE DEMOCRATIC

UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE - DISTRICT 4 ROGER D DAY DEMOCRATIC

UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE - DISTRICT 4 JOHN L FUTRELL DEMOCRATIC 

UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE - DISTRICT 4

 HOWARD JOSEPH POLLCHIK DEMOCRATIC

STATE REPRESENTATIVE - DISTRICT 044 JIM BAIRD REPUBLICAN

JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT - 

PUTNAM COUNTY DENNY BRIDGES REPUBLICAN

PROSECUTING ATTORNEY - PUTNAM COUNTY (64TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT)

TIM BOOKWALTER REPUBLICAN

COUNTY CLERK (PUTNAM) HEATHER GILBERT REPUBLICAN

COUNTY RECORDER (PUTNAM) TRACY BRIDGES REPUBLICAN

COUNTY SHERIFF (PUTNAM) STEVE FENWICK REPUBLICAN

 COUNTY SHERIFF (PUTNAM) CRAIG SIBBITT REPUBLICAN

COUNTY SHERIFF (PUTNAM) SCOTT STOCKTON REPUBLICAN

COUNTY SURVEYOR (PUTNAM) DAVID E PENTURF REPUBLICAN

COUNTY ASSESSOR (PUTNAM) NANCY DENNIS REPUBLICAN

COUNTY COMMISSIONER - DISTRICT #2 - (PUTNAM)JOHN K HUBER REPUBLICAN

COUNTY COMMISSIONER - DISTRICT #2 - (PUTNAM)MAX L WATTS REPUBLICAN

COUNTY COMMISSIONER - DISTRICT #2 - (PUTNAM)

RICK WOODALL REPUBLICAN

COUNTY COUNCIL MEMBER - 

DISTRICT #3 - (PUTNAM) DARREL L THOMAS REPUBLICAN

MARION TOWNSHIP TRUSTEE (PUTNAM) GREGORY L ARNOLD REPUBLICAN

MARION TOWNSHIP BOARD MEMBER

 (PUTNAMDELOSS GREENLEE REPUBLICAN MARION TOWNSHIP BOARD MEMBER (PUTNAM) SHERMAN R SPARKS REPUBLICAN MARION TOWNSHIP BOARD MEMBER (PUTNAM) JIM WILLIAMSON REPUBLICAN

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

New Livestock Rules for Indiana

 New federal regulations covering the interstate movement of livestock are now in effect, and the Indiana Board of Animal Health is implementing new rules governing the movement of animals within the state. Dr. Bret Marsh, state veterinarian, says most Indiana producers are already doing what is necessary, “Many of the things producers are doing no will work well and will continue to be recognized under the new federal rules as well as the new state rules.” Marsh says the new rules will be presented to the board this week and will require all livestock to be tagged, “If we are using radio frequency ID, that is an 840 tag, or if a plastic or steel noose tag is used, then those will be recognized anywhere in the US.”

Bret-Marsh
Bret-Marsh

Marsh says the new rules also require premise identification, something that is already well established in Indiana, “We have nearly 60 locations registered as livestock premises in the state.” He told HAT the information collected by BOAH is secure and protected. He added it is important to have this information so that people can be notified quickly if there is a disease incident. Marsh praised Hoosier livestock producers for adopting these new procedures well ahead of much of the rest of the nation and, as a result, they will see very little disruption in the movement of livestock. He added that many of the major livestock shows in the state have adopted the new tagging protocols several years ago, “Both the Hoosier Beef Congress and the Indiana State  Fair now require this electronic identification of livestock.”

Dr. Marsh and BOAH staff have been discussing the new rules at winter livestock meetings around the state and are collecting producer and industry comments. Marsh said the first reading of the rules will take place at this week’s board meeting with final implementation expected by late in the year. The next meeting of the Board of Animal Health will take place, at 9:30 a.m. on Thursday, April 10, 2014 at the Board of Animal Health office at Discovery Hall – Suite 100, 1202 East 38th Street, , Indianapolis, Indiana. 

For more information in the new rules visit    http://www.in.gov/boah/2336.htm

Saturday, March 29, 2014

Putnam County Fair website

http://www.putcofair.org/ is the website for all of the Putnam County Fairgrounds information in Greencastle, Indiana.  It includes a calendar and booking information.